Feb 15, 2019
Jamie Graham, Vice President of Product Support
Jamie Graham, Vice President of Product Support

Working for Snorkel since 2010, Jamie Graham took on the role of global vice president of product support in 2016. He is responsible for delivering world-class product support for Snorkel equipment globally.

Jamie provides strategic direction at an executive level for Snorkel product support, which aims to help maximize uptime on the job by providing customers with training, spare parts and technical support. He leads an international team that oversees parts stock, fill percentages, product warranties, field campaigns, service and parts publications, and training.

What makes Snorkel unique?
At Snorkel, we have a “make it happen” attitude throughout the entire product support group, Snorkel customers receive unrivaled support with direct access to the executive team and ownership.

How does Snorkel elevate the work at height industry?
Durable design. Simple troubleshooting. Design upgrades driven directly from day-to-day operator feedback. These are the core components that drive innovation within the business and throughout the industry.

Feb 6, 2019
Aerial Equipment Winter Weather Prep – IC machines
Winter weather prep: IC machines

Similar to battery-operated aerial lifts, gas- and diesel-powered machines should be winterized for operating in cold climates. To prepare for winter weather, follow these steps to keep your machine working in low temperatures.

  1. Check Oil

    All Snorkel lifts are delivered with ISO 32 hydraulic oil that allows the machine to operate in temperatures as low as 0° F (-17° C). If operating or storing lifts in sub-zero temperatures for extended periods, check for oil contamination. The colder the temperature, the more likely oil will freeze and prevent operation.

    • A milky appearance indicates a high degree of condensation or the presence of water in the oil
    • Foaming means the oil is aeriated, and the machine must undergo troubleshooting to repair any opening
    • An unusual smell could mean the wrong fluid was poured into the machine

    If any of the above is found, the hydraulic fluid needs to be flushed and filled with new oil before operation. The same steps should be applied to engine oil.

  2. Check Fuel

    Diesel fuel can freeze in cold temperatures and keep operators from starting the engine. To prevent the fuel from gelling and clogging any lines, maintain the fuel to ensure cold weather operation.

    • Add anti-gel to diesel fuel to prevent gelling
       
  3. Check Antifreeze

    Antifreeze should be checked periodically for contamination and corrosion that may require the radiator and cooling system to be flushed for safe operation.

    • Use glycol meter and set at -35° F (-37° C)
       
  4. Startup Procedure

    Before starting up the engine, perform a check and equip your machine with the right features to keep things running smoothly.

    • Check the fuel and water separator; if water is present, check the filter and drain the separator
    • Be sure to activate the glow plug or grid heater for 10-15 seconds before starting the engine
    • Once engine is running and before operating, warm up hydraulics (i.e. boom retract or holding over relief) to get oil moving
       
  5. Storage Procedure

    How fuel is stored is just as important as the condition of the fuel and the tank on the machine. It is critical to prevent contaminants from entering stored fuel.

    When storing your machine, protecting key components from freezing is crucial for operating in cold weather.

    • Use a pre-filter and water separator for bulk storage
    • Block heaters are highly recommended for cold weather when machines are stored outside
    • Battery warmers are recommended for extended cold weather operation

    Snorkel offers accessories for equipment working in cold climates, including the Cold Weather Package and Extreme Cold Weather Package.

Read the first part of this series for tips on winterizing battery-operated machines.

Jan 23, 2019
Aerial equipment winter prep
Winter weather prep: DC machines

When temperatures drop, it is important to winterize your aerial lift equipment to keep them operating in extreme cold climates. This two-part series provides a general guideline for winterization on battery-operated and diesel-powered machines.

Follow these steps to prepare your DC, or battery-operated, machine for winter weather.

  1. Check Hydraulic Oil

    All Snorkel lifts globally are delivered with ISO 32 hydraulic oil that allows the machine to operate in temperatures as low as 0° F (-17° C). If operating or storing lifts in sub-zero temperatures for extended periods, check for oil contamination. The colder the temperature, the more likely oil will freeze and prevent operation.

    • A milky appearance indicates a high degree of condensation or the presence of water in the oil
    • Foaming means the oil is aeriated, and the machine must undergo troubleshooting to repair any opening
    • An unusual smell could mean the wrong fluid was poured into the machine

    If any of the above is found, the hydraulic fluid needs to be flushed and filled with new oil before operation.

  2. Check Batteries

    Flooded lead acid batteries on your battery-operated aerial lift could have an average life span of 48-72 months. If stored in climates below freezing, batteries could freeze and require replacement. Below are items to check while maintaining batteries.

    • Check the age of the batteries
    • Check the fill condition
    • Charge the batteries and perform a load test when the batteries are warm
    • Check all connections for cleanliness and tightness
    • In extremely cold temperatures, it is recommended to install a battery warmer

 Read the next part of this series for tips on winterizing gas- or diesel-powered machines.

Jan 16, 2019
Jeff Eckhardt
Jeffrey Eckhardt, P.E., is the vice president/chief engineer of Snorkel and Xtreme Manufacturing.

The new ANSI/SAIA A92 standards are a suite of complementary standardizations that cover the design and testing, safe use, and training for mobile elevating work platforms (MEWPs). These requirements are based on ISO 16368:2010, which is put forth by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).

Accredited by American National Standards Institute (ANSI), for the U.S., the new ANSI/SAIA A92 standards applies to American MEWP manufacturers; as does the EN280 in Europe, AS1418.10 in Australia and CSA B354.6 in Canada. While each set contains some unique regional requirements, machines that comply with the standards generally can be sold and operated in most major markets worldwide.

Published on December 10, 2018, the new A92.20/.22/.24 standards will become fully effective on December 10, 2019. Deviating from the previous standards published in early 2018, the new suite is not specific to one type of platform. A92.20 will encompass design and testing aspects for manual and self-propelled masts, scissors, booms and personnel lifts as well as underbridge MEWPs. The safe-use standard, A92.22, and training standard, A92.24, will also apply to all these types of aerial equipment.

Under the new standards, aerial equipment is categorized as a Group A or B, and further as a Type 1, 2 or 3. Group A machines have platforms such that the center of the platform area, in all configurations and inclinations, never moves beyond the tipping lines. Group B consists of machines that do not meet the requirements of Group A.

In general, most scissor lifts meet the requirements for Group A. Conversely, most boom lifts do not, and are therefore categorized as Group B. Type 1 MEWPs, which could be self-propelled, push-around or trailer-mounted mast lifts, only permit travelling in the stowed position. Type 2 MEWPs have travel controls located on the chassis, and Type 3 have travel controls located at the operator work station in the platform. Most Snorkel lifts are in the Type 1 or Type 3 category.

Stricter testing and calculation requirements under A92.20 include factoring for wind loads, and dynamic and manual forces that may be exerted on machines. Designers must calculate and apply these loads through testing mandates to determine compliance. While these design requirements could result in changes to machine weight, operation would not be affected.

More noticeable physical changes to equipment design include enhanced stability requirements for platform load sensing systems on most machines. A platform load sensing system monitors and alerts operators if the rated platform load has been exceeded.

The standard requires that the platform load sensing system to trigger an alert after the rated platform is reached but prior to the platform load reaching 120% of the rating. It further requires that a warning consisting of a flashing red light and an acoustic signal be activated for a minimum of five seconds every minute for as long as the overload persists. The load sensing system is not required to stop movement if the overload occurs during movement, the system shall prevent any movement if the platform is stationary.

Certain machines with small platforms must meet enhanced stability and overload criteria in lieu of a platform load sensing system, and only a small number of machines will not require platform load sensing.

There are no solutions defined by the standards for how the platform load sensing systems must function or what type of apparatus is utilized as long as the criteria is met. This method allows equipment manufacturers to be creative and innovative in technology and design.

The new standard also increased the minimum requirement for handrail height from 39 in. to 43.3 in. (0.9m to 1.1m). Many models are manufactured with fixed handrails and a stowed height below 79 in. (2.0m) to easily fit through standard doorways. To comply with the new standards, such models may need to be redesigned with folding handrails. This change could increase both cost and complexity, and will most likely affect scissor lifts with a maximum platform height of 19 ft. (5.7m), one of the most highly produced MEWP units.

Also affecting scissor lifts is a restriction on flexible entrances, such as chain entrances. Instead, aerial lifts must be designed with gravity gates, swing gates or saloon gates. Snorkel lifts eliminated chain entrances in 2014 and produce all scissor lifts with saloon¬-style swing gates as standard.

Toeboards are now required at the entrance of all boom lifts. This is already available as an option on Snorkel boom lifts to comply with various international standards. And newly designed boom lifts will include a toeboard at the entrance to meet requirements.

Pneumatic, or air filled, tires will likely become less common with the new standard, which requires any pneumatic tire equipped machine to undergo flat tire testing or be equipped with a tire pressure monitoring system to ensure that stability is maintained in the event of tire deflation. Most machines will likely be equipped with foam filled or solid tires to easily comply with requirements. Snorkel has been offering primarily foam filled and solid tires since 2016 to meet growing demand.

Slab operated scissor lifts and mast lifts, among several other MEWPs, may be rated as indoor use only under the new standard due to wind loads. This does permit lighter machine weights for compact, indoor-rated machines. Any machine operating outdoors or in areas of potential wind load must undergo calculation and testing to ensure stability in up to 28 mph (12.5m/s) winds.

In addition to the previously required tilt alarm, MEWPs must prevent certain movements from reaching the limits of chassis inclination. Due to new requirements for stability and structure evaluation, some machines may have different tilt limits than previously permitted. As such, operators must be familiar with the operating parameters of compliant equipment.

Finally, the new standard sets limits on the function speeds of MEWPs. The maximum speed is based on a single function and the speed at which the operator will move. If the accelerations and decelerations are low enough, the speeds may be set to a higher limit. The previous standards did not have any maximum limit on function speed; it was merely determined by operator comfort.

About the Contributor
Jeffrey Eckhardt, P.E., is the vice president/chief engineer of Snorkel and Xtreme Manufacturing where he oversees new product development, product safety and international standard compliance. He is also currently on the ANSI A92 committee.

Dec 10, 2018

The Toolbox by SnorkelCreated exclusively for Snorkel products, The Toolbox™ is an extensive resource center for owners and operators. Inside, you'll find everything you need to operate your Snorkel lift to its highest potential.

Stay up-to-date with step-by-step technical guides, instructional videos, blog articles and other resources for servicing, maintaining and safely operating your Snorkel lift.

Our highly knowledgeable Snorkel product support and spare parts team will cover various topics including basic troubleshooting, model familiarization, inspection walk-throughs, component testing procedures and current industry trends.

Keep filling your Toolbox with expert tips and product updates by subscribing to The Toolbox or following Snorkel on social media.

Dec 10, 2018

The Platform(TM)There's no upside to downtime on a jobsite. Snorkel stands behind our products from the assembly line through its long working life. This extends to our genuine spare parts and accessories to keep equipment running.

The Platform™ is a 24/7 online system to easily search and order genuine Snorkel spare parts anytime. Quickly gain interactive access to all Snorkel parts and service manuals, hydraulic and electric schematics, product bulletins, recommended spare parts lists, and more.

With more than 40,000 active parts numbers and over millions of dollars in replacement parts, you can rest assured that you will find what you need. Snorkel offers multiple shipping options to locations all over the world. And our 95% fill rate on all fast moving parts means that the right parts are delivered on time, the first time.

For more information or to shop parts, visit http://theplatform.snorkellifts.com/.